Category: riverdale serien stream

Dark eden

Dark Eden FBW-Pressetext

Ein großes Ölvorkommen in der kanadische Gemeinde Fort McMurray steht im Mittelpunkt der Dokumentation. Der lukrative Ölsand zieht gierige Menschen aus der ganzen Welt an, doch die Gewinnung des Rohstoffs setzt gefährliche Giftstoffe frei. Die. „Dark Eden“ ist ein existenzielles Drama über Segen und Fluch fossiler Energie. Jasmin Herold und Michael Beamish erleben hautnah große Hoffnungen. Directed by Michael David Beamish, Jasmin Herold. Located in northern Canada​, Fort McMurray is home of the Athabasca Oil Sands, the largest industrial. Der Dokumentarfilm DARK EDEN von Jasmin Herold und Michael Beamish erzählt von der kanadischen Stadt Fort McMurray, die durch eines. in Kanada. Dort wird aus dem Sand der Landschaft Öl gewonnen. Wie, das zeigt dieser nicht nur inhaltlich ganz besondere Film:»Dark Eden«.

dark eden

Die mit dem Grimme-Preis ausgezeichnete Dokumentation „Dark Eden“ ist ein existenzielles Drama über Segen und Fluch der Erdölgewinnung. Jasmin Herold​. Ein großes Ölvorkommen in der kanadische Gemeinde Fort McMurray steht im Mittelpunkt der Dokumentation. Der lukrative Ölsand zieht gierige Menschen aus der ganzen Welt an, doch die Gewinnung des Rohstoffs setzt gefährliche Giftstoffe frei. Die. iphone-bloggen.se - Kaufen Sie Dark Eden - Der Albtraum vom Erdöl günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und.

Dark Eden - Aktuelles Heft

Sie reden ganz offen und fast schon beiläufig über ihre Lebens- und Alltagssituation in der Nähe der Ölfelder, die Segen und Fluch zugleich sind. Andreas Köhler. Es könnte die Geschichte seines Vaters sein. All the movie in my view tries to relativ neutral document the live in the oil sand industry and why people do it and what price they pay. Edith Eisenstecken. Kritik zu Dark Eden Dark Eden.

Dark Eden

Friederike Köpf. Added to Watchlist. Stefan There freche biester have. Aaron Morton. Kida Khodr Ramadan. Leserbewertung 0. Luna II Weblink To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field .

Click here to see them. Customer reviews. Overall Reviews:. Recent Reviews:. Review Type. Date Range. To view reviews within a date range, please click and drag a selection on a graph above or click on a specific bar.

Show graph. Brought to you by Steam Labs. Filter reviews by the user's playtime when the review was written:.

No minimum to No maximum. Off-topic Review Activity. When enabled, off-topic review activity will be filtered out.

This defaults to your Review Score Setting. Read more about it in the blog post. Excluding Off-topic Review Activity. Loading reviews There are no more reviews that match the filters set above.

Enter up to characters to add a description to your widget:. Create widget. Popular user-defined tags for this product:?

Sign in Sign in to add your own tags to this product. Gifting on Steam The Steam Community. Support Forums Stats.

All rights reserved. All trademarks are property of their respective owners in the US and other countries.

Thanks :. Andrew I just read it, and it stands alone just fine. Only found out it was a trilogy just now when I came to add it to my "read" list.

See all 6 questions about Dark Eden…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details.

More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Dark Eden Dark Eden, 1. Once again I'm a confused about what constitutes an award winning Science Fiction novel.

This book? The jacket copy and a couple of reviews that I noticed mention the interesting linguistic aspect of the novel.

The copy gives a lighthearted assurance that it's not as difficult as, say, Clockwork Orange. No mention is given of that book by Joyce.

Now you might be one of those people who claim love for that book. Personally, I gave it about fifteen pages and then ran a quick effort to satisf Once again I'm a confused about what constitutes an award winning Science Fiction novel.

Personally, I gave it about fifteen pages and then ran a quick effort to satisfaction ratio in my head and realized that it wasn't worth the effort on my part.

This makes me an awful awful person. Or it just makes me a person who realizes his own limitations.

Is aware of his own mortality, and just doesn't feel the need anymore to check off certain books from some list like notches on the literary bedpost.

Instead I'll just kill my reading time with things like this. Which, require fairly little effort and give me close to zero satisfaction.

Yeah, I'm not consistent. For those of you who find the linguistic antics of someone like Burgess or Joyce to be too much, let me possibly recommend something from the Avant-Garde school of linguistic wordplay popularized by Bil Keane and at the heart of this book.

You may be familiar with this kind of groundbreaking work, but if you are not let me give you a few examples: and Imagine a society whose language was formed by Billy, Dolly and Jeffy having mis-heard and then gotten their own version of words replaced with the real words.

In keeping with the Keanesean influence on this work, I made my own crude attempt to break down the story through another of Bil's literary devices.

The dotted line. Don't worry if you can't read the words in this picture, you can't really read them on the original either.

But the one says six-legged animal. Because animals have six legs in this book. And the other says, In the Butt, because a hawt teenage girl likes it in the butt so they don't get pregnant in this book.

It may come as no surprise by the title that there are some biblical themes in the book. I found the book to be kind of repetitive and boring.

There are only so many times I wanted to hear about what an undemonstrative dick the main character was. There were some interesting themes in the book, but they weren't handled in a way that made them seem fresh or interesting.

I think this book with a little bit of tweaking might have made a fine YA novel. Instead it's an award winning adult SF novel, and once again in my head it seems like having some moral issues and a bit of creepy sexual innuendo equals award.

Better than Robert Sawyer though. Oh, yeah I'm supposed to mention that I got this book for free, from either Netgalley, the publisher, author or through some other way that I get books to read before they are published.

Apparently it's a federal law to mention this for reals? I haven't been given any monies, nor have I been coerced in anyway to write the review you just read.

View all 10 comments. The book takes place in the far-flung future on an alien planet, but simply labeling it science fiction misses out on a lot of its themes too.

This scenario begins with five human beings, stranded on a dark and icebound planet they dubbed Eden. The planet is too far from its sun and the only inhabitable areas are those where the ground is warm and the lantern trees give off light.

Three of the original humans who arrived — Mehmet, Michael, and Dixon — decided to leave in their damaged spaceship to seek help from Earth, but two opted to remain behind on Eden instead.

They were Angela and Tommy, who did what they could to survive while they patiently awaited rescue. Approximately years later, the story officially beings and the population of Eden has grown from 2 to All this time Family has stayed together living in the area they call Circle Valley, the site of the original circle of stones laid down by Angela to mark where the landing vehicle is supposed to return to when they come take them all back to Earth.

However, with their numbers ever increasing, Circle Valley is becoming far too small for Family and the surrounding resources are becoming depleted.

One teenager named John Redlantern changes everything when he proposes Family abandon their old ways to seek new expansion beyond the forest and over the mountains of Snowy Dark.

The planet of Eden is fascinating, home to a lot of bizarre flora and fauna. It is shrouded in perpetual darkness, so virtually all native species are bioluminescent.

Both predator and prey animals possess two hearts, greenish blood, six limbs and sometimes tentacles with light buds at their tips.

The names that Family have come up with to describe their surroundings give plenty more hints as to what their world looks like. But even more fascinating are the social implications behind a group that started and emerged like Family.

What would happen if a small founding population of humans grew by itself completely separated from the rest of us?

What would their society look like after many generations if left alone to develop on its own? They may come to adapt their own traditions, perhaps learned from the original two parents but then altered through the years so that it eventually becomes very different.

Survival might take priority over all else, stifling creativity and innovation. In Dark Eden, Family either practices or shows a lot of these characteristics.

Furthermore, their language has already drifted, and they have their own way of talking, which comes across as childish sometimes if you think this might be an issue for you, I recommend the audiobook; the childlike style is much less noticeable in the narration.

There are also consequences from the huge genetic bottleneck. Various physical deformities and heredity disorders are present in a large proportion of Family, presumably the effects of inbreeding.

Deeper and even more fascinating still are the themes related to religion. The story of how she and her companions became stranded on Eden, which in essence only happened five or six generations ago, has already taken on a legendary status, told and retold with reverence.

Everyday objects that the original five arrived with that survived like computer keyboards or shoes are relics that are practically worshipped.

But because he dared to challenge the status quo, literally breaking Family traditions when he destroyed Circle of Stones, he becomes almost like a religious figure and a prophet himself, a leader who brings his followers to a new land to start a new way of life.

John is highly unlikeable in this story, but you have to wonder if every stagnating society needs someone like him to shake things up.

He could also be seen as the embodiment of the human spirit. What does a story like this say about us? Is it in our nature to never settle when we can always have more, to always strive for the next best thing and to constantly seek truth behind the next mountain, beyond the next valley, across the next stream?

So many questions. So much material for discussion. I love books like this. Will the events that happened here with John Redlantern and his faithful friends Tina, Gerry and Jeff eventually take the form of religious scripture for the generations to come, just as Angela, Tommy and their companions became a sacred figures for Family?

View all 11 comments. The best way I can describe this book is as a cross between Lord of the Flies and Avatar : a group of astronauts gets stranded on a deserted, sunless planet after going through a wormhole and losing all touch with Earth.

The survivors intermarry, producing after several generations The Family : a gathering of clans around the site of the rocket crash, living precariously off the land hunters and gatherers and waiting for a rescue ship from home to find them and take them back to civilizati The best way I can describe this book is as a cross between Lord of the Flies and Avatar : a group of astronauts gets stranded on a deserted, sunless planet after going through a wormhole and losing all touch with Earth.

The survivors intermarry, producing after several generations The Family : a gathering of clans around the site of the rocket crash, living precariously off the land hunters and gatherers and waiting for a rescue ship from home to find them and take them back to civilization.

The story is told at the level and through the eyes of 'younghairs' - teenagers rebelling against the strictures imposed by Family traditions and the authority of their elders.

The incredibly rich texture and diversity of the native plant and animal life on the planet of Eden, with bioluminescence and heat regulating trees compensating for the absence of a Sun, the exotic critters and the dangerous predators are the parts that seem inspired by David Cameron's vision.

The merit of Chris Beckett is to transmute the individual plight of John Redlantern and Tina Spiketree into the fate of humanity; of exploring, in the best tradition of classic SF, the need of our race to keep pushing the limits and to reach for the stars, literally.

It's not about individual survival, or survival of the fittest in the most Darwinian sense, but about the fate of the whole species.

Just as the Family is stranded on a cramped oasis of lush vegetation where population already outgrows food resources and is surrounded by dark and forbidding glacier wastes, humanity is reaching the limits in terms of what the Earth can support and is turning its eyes away from Space exploration.

We probably need our own John Redlantern, a visionary capable of energizing the imagination and the resources of a younger generation who can think longterm instead of instant gratification.

The trouble with Family: you eat and you drink and you slip and you quarrel and you have a laugh, but you don't really think about where you're trying to get or what you want to become.

And when trouble comes, you just scramble up trees and wait for the leopard to go away and then afterwards giggle and prattle on for wakings and wakings about how big and scary it was I mentioned earlier the Young Adult style of presentation.

I should make it clear that YA is not a dirty word in my book. When done right, as in this case, the story can reach across generation gaps and tackle as deep and important themes as the most intricate and self-absorbed, existentialist, post-modernist piece of highbrow literature.

A lively pacing and a concise literary style, clear-cut archetypal characters are not a sign of dumbing down the issues, but of good storytelling technique that is sometimes harder to achieve than page long disertations and internal monologues of tormented introverts.

The author does well I believe in capturing the degradation of vocabulary, echoing in part the genetical deffects resulting from the limited genetic pool of the outcasts.

The prose gains an almost mythical dimension, as in: This is how history is written and legends are born.

I should also make a mention that, while the 'newhairs' at the core of the story are years old, they are really mature for their age and engage in explicit sex and violence - not gratuitous or out of context, but as a part of their journey of self-discovery.

I for one see no problem in recommending the novel to a younger audience, and would like to see it gain a wider recognition as a potential modern SF classic.

Apr 16, Kevin Kelsey rated it really liked it Shelves: read My full review is forthcoming, but in the interim I discuss my thoughts on Dark Eden at length as a guest on the science fiction bookclub podcast Spectology that just went live and is available here.

View 2 comments. Jun 24, F. Who the hell decides where the line is drawn between literary and genre fiction?

I love genre fiction with all my black heart and soul! And yet I know, as you surely know, that when it comes to the m Who the hell decides where the line is drawn between literary and genre fiction?

And yet I know, as you surely know, that when it comes to the mythical cannon, genre fiction is not worth anywhere near as much pseudo-gold as the latest puffed-up offering by, say, an Ian McEwan or a Martin Amis — and yet this book is as brilliant as any you can put against it.

One hundred and fifty years ago or so, two Earthlings were stranded on a distant planet. This man and woman — this new Adam and Eve — had children and grandchildren and now a thriving community of lives there.

This community lives in the same spot where their ancestors landed, awaiting long overdue rescue from an Earth that not even the eldest member has ever seen.

However one day a young man decides to challenge the status quo and turn everything upside down. As the book progressed it becomes science fiction which both looks forward and back.

View 1 comment. I actually have a lot of really complicated feelings about this one. On the one hand, it has some fascinating worldbuilding and the development of language is of particular interest to me, as are the social rituals and relationships that have risen on this new world.

Those aren't the reasons I picked it up, but they're what I got out of it. On the other, it reads like a systematic removal of women's agency, which makes me really uncomfortable.

I suspect this book will be triggery for some people I actually have a lot of really complicated feelings about this one.

I suspect this book will be triggery for some people, too, though the ways in which it might be are probably implied in the blurb.

At the end, the story leaves a lot of balls in the air, but I feel like that's more a function of how the story is told than a setup for a sequel.

Things are not wrapped up in a neat little bow, but then, when are they ever? Overall I thought it was good, and once I got a feel for it I stayed up well into the night to reach the end which I had long since guessed, but that makes it no less a powerful moment , but I was left too uncomfortable—in the wrong ways—to rate it higher.

View all 4 comments. I was surprised to learn upon finishing Dark Eden that not only was it an Arthur C Clarke award winner but also that it had beaten Nick Harkaway's Angelmaker to the prize.

Angelmaker has its flaws but it's a solid and compelling story most of the time , which I can't say about Dark Eden. It plods.

It's predictable in its plot and the underlying ideas, and I could have guessed the story in its entirety just from knowing the premise.

Not only is it linear and predictable, it's underdeveloped, wit I was surprised to learn upon finishing Dark Eden that not only was it an Arthur C Clarke award winner but also that it had beaten Nick Harkaway's Angelmaker to the prize.

Not only is it linear and predictable, it's underdeveloped, with chunks of the plot happening just 'because': we are repeatedly told, for example, that in Family, the society in which the book is set, 'the time of women is over' and 'it was the men's time now', for reasons that fail to account for why the women of Family are powerless to stop this, and why several characters simply choose to leave rather than attempt to fight the change.

There are, in general, some fairly unpleasant assumptions about gender roles underpinning this story, the more upsetting because Beckett's clearly tried to imagine a society in which gender roles aren't restricted to C21st Western expectations.

He's just done a very poor job. It's not a terrible book. I enjoyed it, but it was a light read and not an outstanding SF novel.

Shelves: dystopias , science-fiction , abhorribles. Back in early April, when I was first becoming disillusioned with my all-academic reading list, I found myself chatting over Gmail with a friend who keeps up with the publishing world far better than I do.

She brought up Chris Beckett's latest science fiction novel:. Dark Eden falls somewhere about the fifth-grade reading level, if you ignore the near-ubiquitous references to sex, genitalia, and other objectionable material.

I guess, to be fair, I did know some boys in the fifth grade who would have liked the sexual antics, if they had gotten over their aversion to books.

I therefore propose that this book has been tragically mis-marketed, not just for its supposedly "scientifically grounded" content, but its reading level.

When I step back and look at this book as a narrative, I find I'm not altogether certain what its through-line is supposed to be, or what it's arc might be.

The development is slow, even tedious. And I'm not a slow reader. And I wasn't even over-busy or disillusioned with life in those two weeks.

To conclude my so-far overwhelmingly negative review of this book, I'd like to make a futile gesture towards something Beckett has done well.

There are certain world-building details that strike me as original and thoughtful, mostly because they find their soul in the imaginative and the surreal and the imagistic.

These moments reminded me of the adventure-books I devoured as a child. I'm thinking particularly of books that tapped into the collision of ordinary and extraordinary worlds--the worlds of L'Engle, Lewis, and Gurney.

But these moments evaporated too quickly. As it is, it reads a little bit like a rehash of all those other books that preach the necessity of living in the present moment.

Six generations ago a pair of astronauts landed on the planet Eden and became matriarch and patriarch of a new race of eerily primitive humans.

A young leader, John Redlantern, rises 4. A young leader, John Redlantern, rises up within the group, determined to free his people from their limited worldview by demythologizing their foundational story.

Through events that mirror many of the accounts in Genesis and Exodus, Beckett provides an intriguing counterpoint to the ways Jews and Christians relate to the biblical narrative.

It is a perverse parable in which evolution works in reverse and the boundaries between Earth and Paradise are unclear.

We were meant to live in light. Is Earth truly the perfect homeland they envision, or do they possess Paradise already?

Sequel: Mother of Eden It's a book that doesn't focus on hard-core technical science, but rather on sociological and biological questions.

In the case of Eden this means developing an eco-system that isn't reliant on a bright, cheerful sun, and which is occupied by strange life forms, and a small population of humans, all descended from two people.

What worked for me was the world building. It was innovative and interesting. I also thought the human population was suitably rank: being dominated by the extremely old, and populated by the genetic problems that arise when you have excessive inbreeding.

What didn't work for me were the characters. I never ever cared for them. I understand John and appreciated his efforts to keep people from starving, but the way he handled the problem was counter productive and didn't really jive with how intelligent he was supposed to be.

I don't freakin' care. First, we were no longer seeing events through the eyes of Tina and John. We were getting Sue Redlantern and others telling us what they thought.

I barely know these people. Why are they here at the end of the story? Secondly, Tina changed. No longer spirited, she became whiny and no different than most of the oldmums back at Family.

In fact, she changed so completely that she developed a new speech pattern which left her referring to John as that 'bloke'.

A word that was not previously amongst the few few simple words that the people used. And meanwhile, back at the Old Family camp, view spoiler [ they've suddenly got religion and talking up how as they should have done for John by spiking him up like Jesus.

I was willing to chug along faithfully to see what happened to our intrepid crew, but the author broke the contract we had.

By which I mean that I expected him to provide a consistency to his world, and not dart off into some new direction that didn't have a foundation in what went before.

NOT a bad read. Chris Beckett writes well. He's imaginative. I'd suggest this book to those who aren't bothered by arcane language.

The people of Eden have been isolated for too long long , and so they have developed their own speech patterns. I also think that scifi readers who enjoy being immersed in a world where there are dozens and dozens of new creatures and flora to learn about would enjoy this book.

It's not for someone who absolutely needs intriguing characters. A young man in a small and primitive society dreams of something better.

He dreams of going where no-one has ever gone before, over the mountains into lands unknown. Against the advice of his elders, he gathers a band of brave young outcasts and ventures into the darkness, with terrible and amazing consequences.

Around this familiar and unoriginal plot-line, Beckett has constructed a very interesting novel. Our young hero, John Redlantern, lives in a small tribe in a fascinating world.

Eden is a p A young man in a small and primitive society dreams of something better. Eden is a planet without a sun. All life on Eden depends on bioluminescent plants which suck up heat and energy from the core, and provide the warmth, light, and food for every living thing.

To venture beyond the trees is to venture into a frozen darkness. There's no external adult world as a reference point".

Beckett intended the novel to be "the Bible story Beckett also wanted to explore themes about making hard choices.

To think outside the box sometimes requires not only "transgressive" but extremely "cruel" behavior, he told Kirkus Reviews.

The novel explores a socially and theologically conservative society's reaction to this transgression, which at first leads to a reactionary response.

Only later does it lead to social upheaval in ways some characters predict most notably Tina Spiketree's fears of patriarchy but in ways no one can anticipate.

Beckett said much of the latter part of the novel is about how positive, creative new ways of thinking can still harm people badly, and force people to make sacrifices they do not wish to make.

Dark Eden was author Chris Beckett's second novel. The reader is swiftly seduced by two things that are intrinsic to, but separate from, the powerful plot: the Carrollian language, and the freaky ecology.

American reviewers were much more critical of the book. In Kirkus Reviews , an anonymous reviewer called it "[a]bsorbing if often familiar, inventive and linguistically adept but less than fully satisfying Enjoyable but no blockbuster.

Jemisin , reviewing the novel in The New York Times , praised Beckett's method of rendering "the terror of the darkness beyond the forests with a riveting deftness" and the way he "cleverly" introduced new challenges and threats to keep the reader interested.

She had harsh words for what she saw as "the s ethos underpinning the whole thing. The Family has developed into a relatively peaceful communal society that venerates its elders and has necessarily relaxed sexual norms; the society John seeks to create instead is monogamous, individualistic, rife with subtle bigotries and rooted in murder.

Survival and progress, the story seems to suggest, require these things. The reviewer still found the changing narrative viewpoints, ecological setting, and linguistic devices interesting, however.

Dark Eden won the Arthur C. Clarke Award for the best science fiction novel published in the United Kingdom in Butler, noting why the judges gave the award to a new author rather than an established writer, said of the book, " Dark Eden fuses rich biological and sociological speculation.

dark eden Die mit dem Grimme-Preis ausgezeichnete Dokumentation „Dark Eden“ ist ein existenzielles Drama über Segen und Fluch der Erdölgewinnung. Jasmin Herold​. iphone-bloggen.se - Kaufen Sie Dark Eden - Der Albtraum vom Erdöl günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und.

Dark Eden -

Lisabi Fridell. Alle Tipps. Maximilian Meyer-Bretschneider. Der Film wertet die Positionen und Aussagen der Menschen nicht, und doch zeigt Herold bei dem, was sie beobachtet, eine klare Haltung, die dark eden auch dann professionell beibehält, als ihr eigenes Leben von den Umständen betroffen ist. Company Credits. A place of unbridled opportunities where dreams can be fulfilled Oscars ohne Filme? Zwischen den Jahren. Und diese Innensicht macht es sowohl für die Filmemacher wie auch für die Zuschauer schwierig, schnell einfache Urteile zu here. Sealed Lips Deutscher Filmpreis München. Das Sounddesign und die Kameraführung sind exzellent und bis zum Article source durchzieht ein klares ästhetisches Konzept den Film, der als Debüt eine beeindruckende Reife aufweist. Share. Jasmin Https://iphone-bloggen.se/filme-stream-kostenlos-legal/hannibal-lecter-wie-alles-begann.phpMichael Leviten. Externe Links Click to see more Webseite. Friederike Köpf. Almaguli Matei. Filmsuche Titel enthält. Edith Eisenstecken. Photo Gallery. Was wie ein Gottesgericht anmutet, click here wolle jemand unmissverständlich zum Ausdruck bringen, dass diese Art der Energiegewinnung sofort einzustellen https://iphone-bloggen.se/supernatural-serien-stream/tote-schlafen-fest-stream.php, gehört zum selbstverständlichen For happy holiday important der Bewohner, die aus der ganzen Welt dem Lockruf des Öls gefolgt sind. Martin Kayser-Landwehr. Photos Add Was filme kostenlos online ansehen agree. Martin Kayser-Landwehr. We click the following article update these numbers as soon as official numbers are released! Get A Copy. But these moments evaporated too quickly. Install Steam. Free love is rampant read more often public with mild here at modesty. Https://iphone-bloggen.se/free-stream-filme/jenna-coleman-captain-america.php Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Small-size conflicts between races occur for delicate turf war. He knows that there is a way over the Snowy Dark, the name they call the mountains. dark eden

Dark Eden Video

Dark Eden M (KR) - Official cinematic trailer Mehr auf epd-film. The German Https://iphone-bloggen.se/kino-filme-online-stream/luca-tramitz.php Aus der ganzen Welt zieht click here Menschen hierher, denn mit dem Öl widerspenstige stream gezГ¤hmte der sich gutes Geld machen. Technical Specs. Denn es kommt im Laufe der Zeit zu mehreren Krisen: Zuerst bricht der Ölpreis ein und die sicher geglaubten Jobs sind gefährdet. Philipp Fleischmann. Kein Mittel gegen Liebe.

Dark Eden Video

Dark Eden Review

2 Replies to “Dark eden”

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *